About

Who We Are

“The future belongs to those who give the next generation hope.” -Pierre Teilhard deChardin

Access Youth Outreach Services

Ensuring all youth are accepted, loved and celebrated.

ACCESS Youth Outreach Services Society is a “youth specific”, award winning, independent, community based registered charity established in 1992. A grass-roots organization, our objective includes the development and delivery of innovative programs and services for youth who may be disadvantaged, marginalized, or at-risk. We create opportunities for youth to reach their full potential. Our goal is to establish a meaningful and reliable relationship with alienated and excluded at-risk youth. We use this relationship to assist youth to manage their challenging life circumstances before a crisis occurs rather than respond after a crisis or trauma has occurred. We believe relationships are the best form of prevention.

ACCESS recently expanded our mandate to serve youth aged 12 – 23

VISION: No Youth is left behind.

MISSION STATEMENT: To provide outreach support and services to youth in our communities.

PURPOSE: “Our purpose is to enhance the QUALITY of life of the youth who are marginalized, isolated, vulnerable, hanging out on the streets, homeless or at risk of homelessness by building RELATIONSHIPS with youth, enhancing their connection with community, and bring services to them.”

Charitable Registration No: 892923764 RR0001

ACCESS has a reputation for being a progressive youth serving agency that is filling a gap in service to street involved youth, complimenting other youth resources, and creating innovative practices in youth engagement.

Alternate definition of AT-RISK YOUTH: We at ACCESS relate to the following definition of at-risk youth as defined by Harla Tumbleson of Seattle Ministry of Children Services. We also strive to NOT be an organization that fails those youth we serve.

“a better definition (of ‘at-risk youths’) is youths who are at risk of being failed by one or more adult or adult driven systems or institutions.”

She goes on further to say, “When we lock kids up as punishment rather than for the sake of public safety, we fail our kids. When we are unable to implement effective multicultural curriculum in schools where a majority of children are from communities of color, we fail our kids. When we allow kids to be bombarded with violence as entertainment, we fail our kids. When we fear young people because of the way they dress, their music, and their overwhelmingly negative portrayal by the media, we fail to recognize the “hero” potential that each possesses.”